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Let’s discover Paris together !

Camille

Let’s discover Paris together !

Gastronomie
Sunset is an enjoyable cafe open from 8 AM to 2 PM for breakfast to cocktails. You can hang out anytime of day or late evening. Many languages spoken and affordable prices but always with high quality and a twist.
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Sunset
100 Rue Ordener
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Sunset is an enjoyable cafe open from 8 AM to 2 PM for breakfast to cocktails. You can hang out anytime of day or late evening. Many languages spoken and affordable prices but always with high quality and a twist.
The balance of tradition and modernity at La Table d’Eugène is assured by the strict observance of seasonality. The menu is updated every 10 days and is inspired by the exceptional herbs, vegetables, and animals grown and raised by the restaurant’s network of small producers. Head chef Geoffroy Maillard and sous-chef François Vaudeschamps together create complex and complimentary dishes that attest to the Alain Chapel quote that “cooking is much more than recipes”. The five-course tasting menu is a treat but if you have the chance to stretch to the eight-course option then go for it. More Info Open In Google Maps Tue - Sat: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Tue - Sat: 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm 18 Rue Eugène Sue, Paris, 75018, France +33142556164 Meal service: Lunch, Dinner Atmosphere: Michelin-Starred, Gourmet, Traditional
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La Table d’Eugène
18 Rue Eugène Sue
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The balance of tradition and modernity at La Table d’Eugène is assured by the strict observance of seasonality. The menu is updated every 10 days and is inspired by the exceptional herbs, vegetables, and animals grown and raised by the restaurant’s network of small producers. Head chef Geoffroy Maillard and sous-chef François Vaudeschamps together create complex and complimentary dishes that attest to the Alain Chapel quote that “cooking is much more than recipes”. The five-course tasting menu is a treat but if you have the chance to stretch to the eight-course option then go for it. More Info Open In Google Maps Tue - Sat: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Tue - Sat: 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm 18 Rue Eugène Sue, Paris, 75018, France +33142556164 Meal service: Lunch, Dinner Atmosphere: Michelin-Starred, Gourmet, Traditional
True, Ladurée is hardly a secret. The famed patisserie is known worldwide for its macarons and, since its opening in 1862, has sprung up in 27 countries around the world. Regardless of its popularity, I will always recommend a visit to Ladurée while in Paris because, well, it is that much more magical within the context of France.
Ladurée Paris Royale
True, Ladurée is hardly a secret. The famed patisserie is known worldwide for its macarons and, since its opening in 1862, has sprung up in 27 countries around the world. Regardless of its popularity, I will always recommend a visit to Ladurée while in Paris because, well, it is that much more magical within the context of France.
Pierre Hermé started his career at just 14 as an apprentice to Gaston Lenôtre (see below) and made a name for himself early on in France, Japan, and the United States as the “Picasso of pastry,” revolutionizing pastry making by embracing bold new flavors, sensations, and pleasures. His macarons continue to be among his chief achievements, with original creations like the Mogador (chocolate and passion fruit), Mosaïc (pistachio, cinnamon, and kirsch-soaked cherry), and Ispahan (rose, litchi, and raspberry), gaining legions of fans. You can try them and more at his 11 stores in Paris.
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Pierre Hermé
72 Rue Bonaparte
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Pierre Hermé started his career at just 14 as an apprentice to Gaston Lenôtre (see below) and made a name for himself early on in France, Japan, and the United States as the “Picasso of pastry,” revolutionizing pastry making by embracing bold new flavors, sensations, and pleasures. His macarons continue to be among his chief achievements, with original creations like the Mogador (chocolate and passion fruit), Mosaïc (pistachio, cinnamon, and kirsch-soaked cherry), and Ispahan (rose, litchi, and raspberry), gaining legions of fans. You can try them and more at his 11 stores in Paris.
A true staple, the mille-feuille is as simple in its tastiness as it is mind-boggling complex to eat without getting it all over yourself. If anyone out there has devised a method of consumption whereby the cream doesn’t shoot out from between the three layers of pastry at the first bite, please make this known to the wider, stickier public. You can’t really go wrong with this one but for something extra special try the mille-feuille devised by Philippe Conticini at La Pâtisserie des Rêves.
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La Pâtisserie des Rêves
93 Rue du Bac
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A true staple, the mille-feuille is as simple in its tastiness as it is mind-boggling complex to eat without getting it all over yourself. If anyone out there has devised a method of consumption whereby the cream doesn’t shoot out from between the three layers of pastry at the first bite, please make this known to the wider, stickier public. You can’t really go wrong with this one but for something extra special try the mille-feuille devised by Philippe Conticini at La Pâtisserie des Rêves.
As old-school French as chocolates come, a mendiant’s four classic toppings of raisins, hazelnuts, figs and almonds represent the Dominican, Augustinian, Franciscan and Carmelite monastic orders respectively. Nowadays, possibly reflecting a more secular France, ingredients include seeds, dried fruits and peels. À la mère de famille is the oldest chocolatier in Paris and produces some of its finest mendiants.
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À la Mère de Famille
35 Rue du Faubourg Montmartre
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As old-school French as chocolates come, a mendiant’s four classic toppings of raisins, hazelnuts, figs and almonds represent the Dominican, Augustinian, Franciscan and Carmelite monastic orders respectively. Nowadays, possibly reflecting a more secular France, ingredients include seeds, dried fruits and peels. À la mère de famille is the oldest chocolatier in Paris and produces some of its finest mendiants.
Guide des Quartiers
Paris has an impressive art scene that is accessible throughout the city, and the cobbled streets of Montmartre are bustling with artists painting breathtaking views, talented street artists and surprising sculptures. That’s not all there is to this fascinating district, however. Delve into the area’s historic past and discover its present-day character. Here are a couple of things to do in Montmartre : Place du Tertre The charming Place du Tertre is featured on countless postcards, so don’t miss the chance to see it for real. It’s bustling with artists busying over their canvases, colourful stalls and souvenirs for sale in a cute cobblestone square. There’s no obligation to buy, though, as the place is more like an open-air gallery than a market. It’s lined with 18th-century buildings that are reminders of its historic past, and has cobbled streets. Sacré Coeur It’d be an insult to not include Montmatre’s sacred basilica on this list, as it’s the defining architectural beauty of this charming neighbourhood. Climb its 222 stairs to the top of Sacré-Coeur and you’ll be treated with the best and most breathtaking view of Paris. The area outside the monument has also become a hotspot for some of the city’s most talented street artists. You’ll also see a variety of street entertainment such as mine artists. Le mur des je t'aime The ‘I Love You Wall’ is a love-themed work of art created by calligraphist Frédéric Baron and mural artist Claire Kito in 2000. The love spills out over a large surface composed of 612 tiles of enamelled lava, on which “I love you” is declared 311 times, in 250 languages. It’s a must-see for romantics visiting Paris, and is a great background for a selfie. The splashes of red on the fresco represent a broken heart, symbolising the human race that has been torn apart and that the wall now strives to reunite. This beautiful artistic monument is located on the square at Place des Abbesses and is open to the public free of charge. Le passe muraille As you are wandering around Montmartre, you’ll sooner or later stumble across Le Passe-Muraille. This fabulous statue-sculpture is a surprising find. It’s inspired by the title of a story by Marcel Aymé (‘The Man Who Walked Through Walls’), about a man named Dutilleul who discovers that he can walk through walls. If you look closely, you’ll notice that his lower hand is shinier than the other one, from all of the tourists who have tried to pull the man out of the wall. Musée Montmartre There’s no better way to discover the secrets of this district than by visiting Montmartre’s very own museum. It stands atop the hill of Montmartre and 14 famous personalities have lived within its walls, from Renoir and Valadon to Dufy and Poulbot. Delve into the glorious history of this bohemian corner through original works by Utrillo, Toulouse-Lautrec and Willette, and enjoy an authentically rustic ambiance. Musée de la vie romantique A trip to Montmartre’s Museum of Romance is the perfect thing to do in the city of romance. Back in the early 1830s Dutch painter Ary Scheffer transformed his home, Hôtel Scheffer-Renan, into a busy salon. It was frequented by a range of artists like George Sand, Frederic Chopin, Eugène Delacroix and Franz Liszt, which explains why the walls of the museum are adorned with relics of their art. As well as the permanent works on show, the museum organises a host of temporary exhibitions, live-music events, book readings and activities for kids. Make sure to visit before October, when the delightful tearoom in the garden’s greenhouse is open. Montmartre cemetery A visit to a cemetery may sound depressing, but in Paris it can be infused with cultural discovery and inspiration. The Montmartre Cemetery lays claim to being the final resting place of literary giants like Émile Zola, who penned the haunting famous French novel Thérèse Raquin, and legends and luminaries like Alexandre Dumas and Edgar Degas. What’s more, most people head straight to the well-known Père Lachaise cemetery to pay their respects to the likes of Jim Morrison and Jacques Brel, and a trip to Montmartre Cemetery is more off the beaten track.
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Montmartre
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Paris has an impressive art scene that is accessible throughout the city, and the cobbled streets of Montmartre are bustling with artists painting breathtaking views, talented street artists and surprising sculptures. That’s not all there is to this fascinating district, however. Delve into the area’s historic past and discover its present-day character. Here are a couple of things to do in Montmartre : Place du Tertre The charming Place du Tertre is featured on countless postcards, so don’t miss the chance to see it for real. It’s bustling with artists busying over their canvases, colourful stalls and souvenirs for sale in a cute cobblestone square. There’s no obligation to buy, though, as the place is more like an open-air gallery than a market. It’s lined with 18th-century buildings that are reminders of its historic past, and has cobbled streets. Sacré Coeur It’d be an insult to not include Montmatre’s sacred basilica on this list, as it’s the defining architectural beauty of this charming neighbourhood. Climb its 222 stairs to the top of Sacré-Coeur and you’ll be treated with the best and most breathtaking view of Paris. The area outside the monument has also become a hotspot for some of the city’s most talented street artists. You’ll also see a variety of street entertainment such as mine artists. Le mur des je t'aime The ‘I Love You Wall’ is a love-themed work of art created by calligraphist Frédéric Baron and mural artist Claire Kito in 2000. The love spills out over a large surface composed of 612 tiles of enamelled lava, on which “I love you” is declared 311 times, in 250 languages. It’s a must-see for romantics visiting Paris, and is a great background for a selfie. The splashes of red on the fresco represent a broken heart, symbolising the human race that has been torn apart and that the wall now strives to reunite. This beautiful artistic monument is located on the square at Place des Abbesses and is open to the public free of charge. Le passe muraille As you are wandering around Montmartre, you’ll sooner or later stumble across Le Passe-Muraille. This fabulous statue-sculpture is a surprising find. It’s inspired by the title of a story by Marcel Aymé (‘The Man Who Walked Through Walls’), about a man named Dutilleul who discovers that he can walk through walls. If you look closely, you’ll notice that his lower hand is shinier than the other one, from all of the tourists who have tried to pull the man out of the wall. Musée Montmartre There’s no better way to discover the secrets of this district than by visiting Montmartre’s very own museum. It stands atop the hill of Montmartre and 14 famous personalities have lived within its walls, from Renoir and Valadon to Dufy and Poulbot. Delve into the glorious history of this bohemian corner through original works by Utrillo, Toulouse-Lautrec and Willette, and enjoy an authentically rustic ambiance. Musée de la vie romantique A trip to Montmartre’s Museum of Romance is the perfect thing to do in the city of romance. Back in the early 1830s Dutch painter Ary Scheffer transformed his home, Hôtel Scheffer-Renan, into a busy salon. It was frequented by a range of artists like George Sand, Frederic Chopin, Eugène Delacroix and Franz Liszt, which explains why the walls of the museum are adorned with relics of their art. As well as the permanent works on show, the museum organises a host of temporary exhibitions, live-music events, book readings and activities for kids. Make sure to visit before October, when the delightful tearoom in the garden’s greenhouse is open. Montmartre cemetery A visit to a cemetery may sound depressing, but in Paris it can be infused with cultural discovery and inspiration. The Montmartre Cemetery lays claim to being the final resting place of literary giants like Émile Zola, who penned the haunting famous French novel Thérèse Raquin, and legends and luminaries like Alexandre Dumas and Edgar Degas. What’s more, most people head straight to the well-known Père Lachaise cemetery to pay their respects to the likes of Jim Morrison and Jacques Brel, and a trip to Montmartre Cemetery is more off the beaten track.
Once a swamp, Le Marais has changed dramatically over the years. The neighbourhood, which was once synonymous with Judaism in Paris, became a hub for LGBT Parisians from the 1980s. Today, the area is one of the most popular places to live and shop. Here are some great things to discover in Le Marais : Rue des Rosiers The Rue des Rosiers is a historic street at the heart of Paris’s Jewish quarter. The street is home to a variety of Jewish restaurants as well as both high-end and vintage clothing stores. Weave through tourists as you window-shop, stopping to chow down on a pastrami sandwich from an American-style deli or snack on hamantaschen at a Jewish bakery. The street’s most popular place to eat is L’As du Fallafel, which serves hefty pita sandwiches filled with falafel balls and smoked eggplant. Overall, the Rue des Rosiers reflects the neighbourhood’s Jewish heritage and its new trendy reputation, making it a must-see in Le Marais. Place des Vosges The Place des Vosges is the oldest planned square in Paris. This expansive square is the ideal place to recuperate after wandering Le Marais. Rows of trimmed trees enclose the square, which features four large fountains and a bronze statue of Louis XIII. The surrounding buildings house shops, galleries, restaurants and, most notably, the Maison de Victor Hugo, where the author lived and wrote for many years. Visit the small museum to see mementos from Hugo’s childhood as well as the rooms where he wrote Les Misérables (1862). Musée Picasso his beloved art museum reopened in 2014 after five years of renovation. Located in a 17th-century hôtel particulier, the museum features approximately 5,000 works by artist Pablo Picasso. The museum also showcases artwork from Picasso’s personal collection, including works by Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas and Henri Matisse. Tourists flock to this museum, so be sure to reserve a ticket online ahead of time. Eglise Saint Paul Saint Louis Built in 1627 by the Jesuits, this visually stunning church is just steps away from the Saint-Paul Métro station. As the first Jesuit church in Paris, the Église Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis shaped the local Jesuit community. Today, the church is still active. It is free to visit, so step through the distinctive red doors to marvel at the sweeping stone interior lit by hanging chandeliers. Institut Suédois The Institut Suédois offers a glimpse into Swedish life and culture. The cultural centre houses a café, theatre, art museum and artist studios. During the summer, spend the afternoon in the institute’s back garden, where an outdoor café serves coffee, tea, smoothies, bagels and cakes. Order a thick slice of home-made carrot cake and people-watch from a bench or recline on a striped beach chair and lose yourself in a book. Fans of all things Swedish can even take language lessons at the institute. Le Carreau du Temple In the last decade, the City of Paris transformed this run-down clothing market into a lively recreation centre. The space, which houses a boutique, bar, restaurant, gym and more, has become a hub of activity in the neighbourhood. Le Carreau du Temple also regularly hosts events, including September’s highly anticipated Street Food Temple, a festival featuring food trucks, workshops for children and concerts. Le jardin d'Anne Franck This spacious garden named after Anne Frank is at the end of a picturesque side street. Quiet and secluded, the garden offers the perfect escape from Le Marais’s small, crowded streets. Read a book under the garden’s beautiful trellis walkway or enjoy lunch beside the fountain. A playground offers the perfect distraction for children. Musée des Arts et Métiers The Musée des Arts et Métiers is a science and technology museum housed in an old abbey. The museum traces the evolution of machines and modes of transportation, proving to be both entertaining and educational. Temporary exhibits add to the experience.
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Le Marais
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Once a swamp, Le Marais has changed dramatically over the years. The neighbourhood, which was once synonymous with Judaism in Paris, became a hub for LGBT Parisians from the 1980s. Today, the area is one of the most popular places to live and shop. Here are some great things to discover in Le Marais : Rue des Rosiers The Rue des Rosiers is a historic street at the heart of Paris’s Jewish quarter. The street is home to a variety of Jewish restaurants as well as both high-end and vintage clothing stores. Weave through tourists as you window-shop, stopping to chow down on a pastrami sandwich from an American-style deli or snack on hamantaschen at a Jewish bakery. The street’s most popular place to eat is L’As du Fallafel, which serves hefty pita sandwiches filled with falafel balls and smoked eggplant. Overall, the Rue des Rosiers reflects the neighbourhood’s Jewish heritage and its new trendy reputation, making it a must-see in Le Marais. Place des Vosges The Place des Vosges is the oldest planned square in Paris. This expansive square is the ideal place to recuperate after wandering Le Marais. Rows of trimmed trees enclose the square, which features four large fountains and a bronze statue of Louis XIII. The surrounding buildings house shops, galleries, restaurants and, most notably, the Maison de Victor Hugo, where the author lived and wrote for many years. Visit the small museum to see mementos from Hugo’s childhood as well as the rooms where he wrote Les Misérables (1862). Musée Picasso his beloved art museum reopened in 2014 after five years of renovation. Located in a 17th-century hôtel particulier, the museum features approximately 5,000 works by artist Pablo Picasso. The museum also showcases artwork from Picasso’s personal collection, including works by Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas and Henri Matisse. Tourists flock to this museum, so be sure to reserve a ticket online ahead of time. Eglise Saint Paul Saint Louis Built in 1627 by the Jesuits, this visually stunning church is just steps away from the Saint-Paul Métro station. As the first Jesuit church in Paris, the Église Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis shaped the local Jesuit community. Today, the church is still active. It is free to visit, so step through the distinctive red doors to marvel at the sweeping stone interior lit by hanging chandeliers. Institut Suédois The Institut Suédois offers a glimpse into Swedish life and culture. The cultural centre houses a café, theatre, art museum and artist studios. During the summer, spend the afternoon in the institute’s back garden, where an outdoor café serves coffee, tea, smoothies, bagels and cakes. Order a thick slice of home-made carrot cake and people-watch from a bench or recline on a striped beach chair and lose yourself in a book. Fans of all things Swedish can even take language lessons at the institute. Le Carreau du Temple In the last decade, the City of Paris transformed this run-down clothing market into a lively recreation centre. The space, which houses a boutique, bar, restaurant, gym and more, has become a hub of activity in the neighbourhood. Le Carreau du Temple also regularly hosts events, including September’s highly anticipated Street Food Temple, a festival featuring food trucks, workshops for children and concerts. Le jardin d'Anne Franck This spacious garden named after Anne Frank is at the end of a picturesque side street. Quiet and secluded, the garden offers the perfect escape from Le Marais’s small, crowded streets. Read a book under the garden’s beautiful trellis walkway or enjoy lunch beside the fountain. A playground offers the perfect distraction for children. Musée des Arts et Métiers The Musée des Arts et Métiers is a science and technology museum housed in an old abbey. The museum traces the evolution of machines and modes of transportation, proving to be both entertaining and educational. Temporary exhibits add to the experience.
In October 1789, the Revolution brought political life back to Louvre-Tuileries after 107 years of absence. Every significant figure of the 19th century, revolutionary, emperor, or king, used the Palais des Tuileries as a base. This palace is long gone, destroyed by arson in 1871 and demolished in 1882, but this turbulent, glamorous period in French history can still be glimpsed in the streets, buildings, and monuments from this era that remain. Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel When Charles Percier and Pierre Fontaine’s Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel was completed after two years in 1808, it formed the centerpiece of a vast courtyard around which military parades could take place. Inspired by Ancient Roman arches, Napoleon I topped his with a quadriga (horse and chariot statue) seized from Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Venice in 1798, a potent symbol of his and France’s military might. After the Bourbon Restoration and his 1815 downfall, the quadriga was yielded to Austria and Charles X replaced it in 1828 with a new one by François Joseph Bosio that honored his family’s return to power. Tuileries Garden Heading past the arch, the yew-filled moats of Charles V, and what would have been the royal palace, you arrive in the Jardin des Tuileries, created in 1564 by Catherine de Medici and not much changed since. The garden has been partially opened to the public since 1667 but during the 19th century it became the place where ordinary Parisians met, relaxed, and were entertained, like when Napoleon I’s wedding cortege passed through it on April 2, 1810. His nephew, Napoleon III, added the Orangerie in 1852 and the matching Jeu de Pomme in 1861, both of which are now museums. Place de la Concorde Louvre-Tuileries’ westernmost square has often reflected the sympathies of ruling powers. It began life in 1755 as the Place Louis XV, in honor of the reigning king, but in 1789 became the (bloody) Place de la Révolution. As an act of reconciliation, it was called the Place de la Concorde but Louis XVIII preferred its original name and Charles X went for the Place Louis XIV. The 1830 July Revolution secured its current name. Louis-Philippe finished the square by erecting the 250-ton Luxor Obelisk on October 25, 1836, and installing two fountains, representing commerce by river and sea, in May 1840. L’Église de la Madeleine From the bottom of the rue Royale, you have an uninterrupted view of the Madeleine, which was inspired by the ancient Maison Carrée in Nîmes. Before the Revolution, two attempts at church building were made on this site and on his ascension to the emperorship Napoleon determined to make it a military shrine, immortalizing the nation’s greatest generals. Finished in 1807, his monument lasted only seven years before being converted to a church under the Bourbon Restoration. Unrelatedly, on August 12, 1843, the rue Royale witnessed a bizarre natural phenomenon: tens of thousands of butterflies amassed on the road, buildings, and traffic causing wonderment and chaos in equal measures. Place Vendôme The Place Vendôme’s history centers around its giant column, which was modeled after Trajan’s Column and erected between 1806 and 1810 by Napoleon. His laurel-crowned likeness was pulled down Saddam Hussein-style in 1816 and melted for Henry IV’s statue on the Pont Neuf. In the 1830s, Louis-Philippe replaced it with an updated version as did Napoleon III. During the Paris Commune, Gustave Courbet petitioned successfully for the column and statue to be dismantled on May 16th, 1871, only to be fined the cost of re-erecting them in 1874. This sent him into exile where he died three years later and his paintings were sold off to pay for the job. Opéra Garnier In 1821, the Paris opera moved to the rue Le Peletier while its new home was planned. However, the Revolution of 1848 intervened and public interest in the project dissipated. With the establishment of the Second Empire in 1852 and the appointment of Georges-Eugène Haussmann as chief city planner, it got a significant boost and another on January 14, 1858, when Napoleon III was almost assassinated outside the Salle Le Peletier. By 1860, its construction was a matter of national urgency. So glorious was the 1,979-seat opera Charles Garnier built between 1861 and 1875 that it was immediately given his name. Palais Brongniart Before the 19th century, stock trading in Paris had taken place at numerous locations around Louvre-Tuileries but they found a permanent home with the Palais Brongniart or Paris Bourse. The building was designed and built by Alexandre-Théodore Brongniart between 1808 and 1813 and completed in 1826 by Éloi Labarre. For over 150 years, this was the center of French trade until the Bourse de Paris merged with other European stock exchanges and relocated to the Euronext headquarters in La Défense in 2000. The building still contains a museum dedicated to its history and that of the market. Galerie Vivienne During the late 18th and early 19th centuries, numerous passages couverts sprang up around the Grands Boulevards district. These precursors to the modern shopping mall provided shortcuts across the city and opportunities to shop, dine, and stroll out of the rain. One of the prettiest is the Galerie Vivienne, which was designed by Francois Jean Delannoy and opened in 1826. This covered passageway, which links the stock exchange and the Palais Royal and the Louvre, was popular until the end of the Second Empire in 1870 when the most glamorous establishments moved to the Madeleine and the Champs-Élysées. However, it has since regained its glory.
Concorde
In October 1789, the Revolution brought political life back to Louvre-Tuileries after 107 years of absence. Every significant figure of the 19th century, revolutionary, emperor, or king, used the Palais des Tuileries as a base. This palace is long gone, destroyed by arson in 1871 and demolished in 1882, but this turbulent, glamorous period in French history can still be glimpsed in the streets, buildings, and monuments from this era that remain. Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel When Charles Percier and Pierre Fontaine’s Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel was completed after two years in 1808, it formed the centerpiece of a vast courtyard around which military parades could take place. Inspired by Ancient Roman arches, Napoleon I topped his with a quadriga (horse and chariot statue) seized from Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Venice in 1798, a potent symbol of his and France’s military might. After the Bourbon Restoration and his 1815 downfall, the quadriga was yielded to Austria and Charles X replaced it in 1828 with a new one by François Joseph Bosio that honored his family’s return to power. Tuileries Garden Heading past the arch, the yew-filled moats of Charles V, and what would have been the royal palace, you arrive in the Jardin des Tuileries, created in 1564 by Catherine de Medici and not much changed since. The garden has been partially opened to the public since 1667 but during the 19th century it became the place where ordinary Parisians met, relaxed, and were entertained, like when Napoleon I’s wedding cortege passed through it on April 2, 1810. His nephew, Napoleon III, added the Orangerie in 1852 and the matching Jeu de Pomme in 1861, both of which are now museums. Place de la Concorde Louvre-Tuileries’ westernmost square has often reflected the sympathies of ruling powers. It began life in 1755 as the Place Louis XV, in honor of the reigning king, but in 1789 became the (bloody) Place de la Révolution. As an act of reconciliation, it was called the Place de la Concorde but Louis XVIII preferred its original name and Charles X went for the Place Louis XIV. The 1830 July Revolution secured its current name. Louis-Philippe finished the square by erecting the 250-ton Luxor Obelisk on October 25, 1836, and installing two fountains, representing commerce by river and sea, in May 1840. L’Église de la Madeleine From the bottom of the rue Royale, you have an uninterrupted view of the Madeleine, which was inspired by the ancient Maison Carrée in Nîmes. Before the Revolution, two attempts at church building were made on this site and on his ascension to the emperorship Napoleon determined to make it a military shrine, immortalizing the nation’s greatest generals. Finished in 1807, his monument lasted only seven years before being converted to a church under the Bourbon Restoration. Unrelatedly, on August 12, 1843, the rue Royale witnessed a bizarre natural phenomenon: tens of thousands of butterflies amassed on the road, buildings, and traffic causing wonderment and chaos in equal measures. Place Vendôme The Place Vendôme’s history centers around its giant column, which was modeled after Trajan’s Column and erected between 1806 and 1810 by Napoleon. His laurel-crowned likeness was pulled down Saddam Hussein-style in 1816 and melted for Henry IV’s statue on the Pont Neuf. In the 1830s, Louis-Philippe replaced it with an updated version as did Napoleon III. During the Paris Commune, Gustave Courbet petitioned successfully for the column and statue to be dismantled on May 16th, 1871, only to be fined the cost of re-erecting them in 1874. This sent him into exile where he died three years later and his paintings were sold off to pay for the job. Opéra Garnier In 1821, the Paris opera moved to the rue Le Peletier while its new home was planned. However, the Revolution of 1848 intervened and public interest in the project dissipated. With the establishment of the Second Empire in 1852 and the appointment of Georges-Eugène Haussmann as chief city planner, it got a significant boost and another on January 14, 1858, when Napoleon III was almost assassinated outside the Salle Le Peletier. By 1860, its construction was a matter of national urgency. So glorious was the 1,979-seat opera Charles Garnier built between 1861 and 1875 that it was immediately given his name. Palais Brongniart Before the 19th century, stock trading in Paris had taken place at numerous locations around Louvre-Tuileries but they found a permanent home with the Palais Brongniart or Paris Bourse. The building was designed and built by Alexandre-Théodore Brongniart between 1808 and 1813 and completed in 1826 by Éloi Labarre. For over 150 years, this was the center of French trade until the Bourse de Paris merged with other European stock exchanges and relocated to the Euronext headquarters in La Défense in 2000. The building still contains a museum dedicated to its history and that of the market. Galerie Vivienne During the late 18th and early 19th centuries, numerous passages couverts sprang up around the Grands Boulevards district. These precursors to the modern shopping mall provided shortcuts across the city and opportunities to shop, dine, and stroll out of the rain. One of the prettiest is the Galerie Vivienne, which was designed by Francois Jean Delannoy and opened in 1826. This covered passageway, which links the stock exchange and the Palais Royal and the Louvre, was popular until the end of the Second Empire in 1870 when the most glamorous establishments moved to the Madeleine and the Champs-Élysées. However, it has since regained its glory.
What to do in Canal Saint Martin ? Share a bottle of wine at the edge of the Canal St Martin with a friend on a warm evening. Many Paris first-timers (and a lot of long-timers) have yet to experience the Canal St Martin, but it is a popular treat with in-the-know Parisians, artists and the Bobo-Chic crowd. Use a Canal St Martin walking tour to find the most charming areas. A bit of history ? The neighbourhood surrounding the Canal Saint-Martin has become a firmly established centre of coolness, developed around the charming strolls along the nearly 200-year-old waterway. You can order some Mexican burritos and tacos from El Nopal and grab a spot on the canal. If you prefer table service, there are also a number of excellent bistros to choose from, such as the popular Restaurant Philou. For the fashionistas, there are the great shops of rue Beaurepaire and rue de Marseille, and when you’re thirsty, classic neighbourhood haunts like Chez Prune or quirky venues like Le Comptoir Général are never far away. Best-known today as a prime spot for sharing an apéritif with friends, Paris’ canal system has a long and surprisingly practical history as the city’s primary source of potable water. However, wine has naturally always played a key part: the canals’ construction was allegedly funded by a tax on the beloved beverage. Running over 100km combined, Paris’ two largest canals run along the entire east half of the city. Although it rings in at a mere 4.5km, the Canal Saint-Martin occupies prime real estate, stretching from the Seine at Port de l’Arsenal up to the Bassin de la Villette, the largest artificial lake in Paris. There, it joins the much more extensive Canal de l’Ourcq, which winds its way through the La Villette neighborhood deep into the communes North-East of the city. While the River Ourcq has been used since the 16th century to transport firewood to Paris, it wasn’t until 1802 that the canals as we know them began to form. After construction delays related to the political turmoil of the period (namely, the fall of Napoleon and the subsequent Bourbon Restoration), the canals were finally inaugurated in 1825. For the next hundred years or so, the canals’ primary functions were to provide potable water and to facilitate the transport of food and materials into the capital, and by the mid-19th century, the banks of the canals had become populated with factories and warehouses to handle the influx of goods. As Paris’ road and water systems improved and the city’s population grew, the site began its slow transformation into the bobo paradise it is today. Now surrounded by a plethora of charming restaurants, cafés, bars, and shops, the canals themselves see more leisure-based traffic like tour boats, rowers, and even some adventurous fishermen — and of course throngs of hip young Parisians picnicking along its banks and tourists posing on the picturesque iron bridges made famous in Amélie. The canals are also home to a few of the city’s more interesting public space projects. Thanks to ‘Paris Respire, cars are prohibited in the area every Sunday during the summer, and every July and August, parts of the canal banks are transformed into a public beach for ‘Paris-Plage,’ complete with imported sand, umbrellas, and beach chairs.
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Canal Saint Martin
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What to do in Canal Saint Martin ? Share a bottle of wine at the edge of the Canal St Martin with a friend on a warm evening. Many Paris first-timers (and a lot of long-timers) have yet to experience the Canal St Martin, but it is a popular treat with in-the-know Parisians, artists and the Bobo-Chic crowd. Use a Canal St Martin walking tour to find the most charming areas. A bit of history ? The neighbourhood surrounding the Canal Saint-Martin has become a firmly established centre of coolness, developed around the charming strolls along the nearly 200-year-old waterway. You can order some Mexican burritos and tacos from El Nopal and grab a spot on the canal. If you prefer table service, there are also a number of excellent bistros to choose from, such as the popular Restaurant Philou. For the fashionistas, there are the great shops of rue Beaurepaire and rue de Marseille, and when you’re thirsty, classic neighbourhood haunts like Chez Prune or quirky venues like Le Comptoir Général are never far away. Best-known today as a prime spot for sharing an apéritif with friends, Paris’ canal system has a long and surprisingly practical history as the city’s primary source of potable water. However, wine has naturally always played a key part: the canals’ construction was allegedly funded by a tax on the beloved beverage. Running over 100km combined, Paris’ two largest canals run along the entire east half of the city. Although it rings in at a mere 4.5km, the Canal Saint-Martin occupies prime real estate, stretching from the Seine at Port de l’Arsenal up to the Bassin de la Villette, the largest artificial lake in Paris. There, it joins the much more extensive Canal de l’Ourcq, which winds its way through the La Villette neighborhood deep into the communes North-East of the city. While the River Ourcq has been used since the 16th century to transport firewood to Paris, it wasn’t until 1802 that the canals as we know them began to form. After construction delays related to the political turmoil of the period (namely, the fall of Napoleon and the subsequent Bourbon Restoration), the canals were finally inaugurated in 1825. For the next hundred years or so, the canals’ primary functions were to provide potable water and to facilitate the transport of food and materials into the capital, and by the mid-19th century, the banks of the canals had become populated with factories and warehouses to handle the influx of goods. As Paris’ road and water systems improved and the city’s population grew, the site began its slow transformation into the bobo paradise it is today. Now surrounded by a plethora of charming restaurants, cafés, bars, and shops, the canals themselves see more leisure-based traffic like tour boats, rowers, and even some adventurous fishermen — and of course throngs of hip young Parisians picnicking along its banks and tourists posing on the picturesque iron bridges made famous in Amélie. The canals are also home to a few of the city’s more interesting public space projects. Thanks to ‘Paris Respire, cars are prohibited in the area every Sunday during the summer, and every July and August, parts of the canal banks are transformed into a public beach for ‘Paris-Plage,’ complete with imported sand, umbrellas, and beach chairs.
Bastille has great dining venues, along with top-notch cocktails at places like the hidden speakeasy Moonshiner and bar-nightclub Badaboum. Master chef Alain Ducasse has also installed his chocolate factory here on rue de la Roquette, and for a worthwhile cultural night out, L’Opéra Bastille remains a sure bet.
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Bastille
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Bastille has great dining venues, along with top-notch cocktails at places like the hidden speakeasy Moonshiner and bar-nightclub Badaboum. Master chef Alain Ducasse has also installed his chocolate factory here on rue de la Roquette, and for a worthwhile cultural night out, L’Opéra Bastille remains a sure bet.
Saint-Germain-des-Prés has an artistic allure and storied literary history – Oscar Wilde lived at what is now the very hip L’Hotel, and classic locales like Café de Flore and Deux Magots were hangouts for figures like Sartre, de Beauvoir and Camus. Today, the existentialists may be long gone, but the perennially cool café culture remains. Top art gallery Kamel Mennour has raised the neighbourhood’s contemporary art profile, and fine cocktails can be found at the Prescription Cocktail Club.
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Saint-Germain-des-Prés
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Saint-Germain-des-Prés has an artistic allure and storied literary history – Oscar Wilde lived at what is now the very hip L’Hotel, and classic locales like Café de Flore and Deux Magots were hangouts for figures like Sartre, de Beauvoir and Camus. Today, the existentialists may be long gone, but the perennially cool café culture remains. Top art gallery Kamel Mennour has raised the neighbourhood’s contemporary art profile, and fine cocktails can be found at the Prescription Cocktail Club.
Right in the heart of the Jewish Quarter, one whole end of the street is lined with restaurants selling falafel and shawarma sandwiches. Do not be fooled by the term “sandwich” here, which may commonly be associated with a light lunch option — these “sandwiches” are exploding with filling and sauce. Go easy on the sauce piquante that you will be offered, as some vendors can be heavy handed with the spice. So which falafel stand should you choose? While L’As du Falafel is the most famous, the quality does not differ hugely between vendors. With such fierce competition, it is imperative that the standard remains consistently high, and all of the menus are similar. If it is a sunny day, try to resist eating it until you get to Jardin des Rosiers-Joseph Migneret (a little public garden conveniently placed just off the road); these sandwiches are not the easiest things to eat on the go, and you don’t want to lose half to the floor or down your front!
Rue des Rosiers
Right in the heart of the Jewish Quarter, one whole end of the street is lined with restaurants selling falafel and shawarma sandwiches. Do not be fooled by the term “sandwich” here, which may commonly be associated with a light lunch option — these “sandwiches” are exploding with filling and sauce. Go easy on the sauce piquante that you will be offered, as some vendors can be heavy handed with the spice. So which falafel stand should you choose? While L’As du Falafel is the most famous, the quality does not differ hugely between vendors. With such fierce competition, it is imperative that the standard remains consistently high, and all of the menus are similar. If it is a sunny day, try to resist eating it until you get to Jardin des Rosiers-Joseph Migneret (a little public garden conveniently placed just off the road); these sandwiches are not the easiest things to eat on the go, and you don’t want to lose half to the floor or down your front!
Cafés
This is the ultimate ‘hipster’ venue, the culmination of canal trendiness and a self-proclaimed temple to ghetto culture. The museum and thrift shop are decorated with typewriters, old maps, and fossils (making for delightful daytime rummaging). Meanwhile two Afro-Caribbean themed bars serving up cocktails take over the night shift. It’s a guaranteed good time, although you’ll be lucky to get a spot big enough to put down your drink – the air here is thick with hipsters. The Comptoir Général also hosts music nights, as well as various educational, cultural, and charity events.
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Le Comptoir Général
80 Quai de Jemmapes
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This is the ultimate ‘hipster’ venue, the culmination of canal trendiness and a self-proclaimed temple to ghetto culture. The museum and thrift shop are decorated with typewriters, old maps, and fossils (making for delightful daytime rummaging). Meanwhile two Afro-Caribbean themed bars serving up cocktails take over the night shift. It’s a guaranteed good time, although you’ll be lucky to get a spot big enough to put down your drink – the air here is thick with hipsters. The Comptoir Général also hosts music nights, as well as various educational, cultural, and charity events.
Point Éphémère returns to the very underground, edgy vibe that has become characteristic of the bars surrounding the canal. It is the epitome of cool, with its graffitied exterior and naked concrete interior walls. A former squat for artists, this place allows you to come here day or night to explore their exhibitions and concerts. Or, just enjoy a beer in the bar. Their outdoor seating area is heated during the winter and extends right down the bank during the summer, making this spot a great choice any time of year.
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Le Point Ephémère
7 Rue Louis Blanc
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Point Éphémère returns to the very underground, edgy vibe that has become characteristic of the bars surrounding the canal. It is the epitome of cool, with its graffitied exterior and naked concrete interior walls. A former squat for artists, this place allows you to come here day or night to explore their exhibitions and concerts. Or, just enjoy a beer in the bar. Their outdoor seating area is heated during the winter and extends right down the bank during the summer, making this spot a great choice any time of year.
Located in the heart of the Bassin de la Villette in the 19th arrondissement, the Pavillon des Canaux has sparked the interest and curiosity of many Parisians. It may be due to the fact that it resembles a large doll’s house where you can dine in any room, including the colourful bathroom. Order your preferred beverage with a plate of avocado on toast or enjoy a full brunch plate during the weekend at this quirky café located by the river.
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Le Pavillon des Canaux
39 Quai de la Loire
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Located in the heart of the Bassin de la Villette in the 19th arrondissement, the Pavillon des Canaux has sparked the interest and curiosity of many Parisians. It may be due to the fact that it resembles a large doll’s house where you can dine in any room, including the colourful bathroom. Order your preferred beverage with a plate of avocado on toast or enjoy a full brunch plate during the weekend at this quirky café located by the river.
This very Instagrammable café is a popular place among locals and tourists. Located on the corner of Rue de l’Abreuvoir in Montmartre, the pink venue stands out among the white buildings surrounding it, making it an unmissable sight. While it was originally established in 1905, it became The Pink House people have come to know in 2017. La Maison Rose offers traditional French dishes such as smoked trout with potatoes and poached eggs, smoked burrata with carrots and beets, and mussels with tarragon vinaigrette.
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La Maison Rose
2 Rue de l'Abreuvoir
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This very Instagrammable café is a popular place among locals and tourists. Located on the corner of Rue de l’Abreuvoir in Montmartre, the pink venue stands out among the white buildings surrounding it, making it an unmissable sight. While it was originally established in 1905, it became The Pink House people have come to know in 2017. La Maison Rose offers traditional French dishes such as smoked trout with potatoes and poached eggs, smoked burrata with carrots and beets, and mussels with tarragon vinaigrette.
Set off for the familiar cobblestone streets of Rue Lepic where the historic Café des Deux Moulins still stands, between flower shops and memories of the curious Amélie Poulain. Though a common ground for film fans and Moulin Rouge tourists, the red booths of the interior café and its traditional French brasserie menu are a must for the experience of coffee-drinking and people-watching at a typical Parisian café.
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双风车咖啡馆
15 Rue Lepic
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Set off for the familiar cobblestone streets of Rue Lepic where the historic Café des Deux Moulins still stands, between flower shops and memories of the curious Amélie Poulain. Though a common ground for film fans and Moulin Rouge tourists, the red booths of the interior café and its traditional French brasserie menu are a must for the experience of coffee-drinking and people-watching at a typical Parisian café.
Cafe Marlette was once a bread-and-pastries-only brand run by sisters Margaux and Scarlette, but has recently branched out to serve more organic specialties beyond scones and cakes. Stop by on a Sunday for brunch to taste their gourmet honey and walnut oil sandwich, quiche, Beillevaire cheeses and filtered coffee from the Maison Coutume. The minimal lighting and relaxed vibe of the café make for a comfy spot to spend the weekend among friends, and is a favorite of many Parisians.
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Café Marlette (Martyrs)
51 Rue des Martyrs
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Cafe Marlette was once a bread-and-pastries-only brand run by sisters Margaux and Scarlette, but has recently branched out to serve more organic specialties beyond scones and cakes. Stop by on a Sunday for brunch to taste their gourmet honey and walnut oil sandwich, quiche, Beillevaire cheeses and filtered coffee from the Maison Coutume. The minimal lighting and relaxed vibe of the café make for a comfy spot to spend the weekend among friends, and is a favorite of many Parisians.
This famous tea house can be found in and around Paris—including at Versailles—but it is the location by the Tuileries Garden that we recommend visiting. Skip the line (because there will be a massive line) and instead head inside to the shop to pick up a hot chocolate to go, some macarons (I recommend cassis and rose) and some mini pastries; then head across the street to the Tuileries to enjoy your sweet loot with a view of the park. Angelina is famous for its thick, almost pudding like, hot chocolate and its too-sweet Mont Blanc dessert.
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Angelina Paris
226 Rue de Rivoli
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This famous tea house can be found in and around Paris—including at Versailles—but it is the location by the Tuileries Garden that we recommend visiting. Skip the line (because there will be a massive line) and instead head inside to the shop to pick up a hot chocolate to go, some macarons (I recommend cassis and rose) and some mini pastries; then head across the street to the Tuileries to enjoy your sweet loot with a view of the park. Angelina is famous for its thick, almost pudding like, hot chocolate and its too-sweet Mont Blanc dessert.
This lovely café in Saint Germain-des-Prés opened back in the 1800s and is one of the oldest coffeehouses in Paris. Like many spots in Paris, Café de Flore became famous for housing many of our century’s greatest artists and writers, such as Picasso, Queneau and Bataille. With a white neon sign and exterior shrouded in flowers and shrubbery, Café de Flore is a popular spot to snag a sidewalk table and enjoy a syrupy hot chocolate and fresh croissant.
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花神咖啡馆
172 Boulevard Saint-Germain
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This lovely café in Saint Germain-des-Prés opened back in the 1800s and is one of the oldest coffeehouses in Paris. Like many spots in Paris, Café de Flore became famous for housing many of our century’s greatest artists and writers, such as Picasso, Queneau and Bataille. With a white neon sign and exterior shrouded in flowers and shrubbery, Café de Flore is a popular spot to snag a sidewalk table and enjoy a syrupy hot chocolate and fresh croissant.
Mariage Frères is a legendary tea brand that has been serving Paris since 1854, making it the oldest seller. They offer some of the highest quality tea in Europe, and their tastes range from classic green teas to sweet floral blends from the most obscure of sources that can easily exceed 100 euros or more. Whilst their ‘tea salon’ is ideally nestled by Musée du Louvre for a sit-down pause, the greatest selection is stored in their shop on the famous Rue Cler, which is widely acknowledged to be the most authentic market street in Paris and possibly even in France. Their luxury tea fits in perfectly with this street’s nickname, “Paradise of Parisian food and drink”, for their tea is absolutely delightful.
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Mariage Frères Étoile
260 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré
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Mariage Frères is a legendary tea brand that has been serving Paris since 1854, making it the oldest seller. They offer some of the highest quality tea in Europe, and their tastes range from classic green teas to sweet floral blends from the most obscure of sources that can easily exceed 100 euros or more. Whilst their ‘tea salon’ is ideally nestled by Musée du Louvre for a sit-down pause, the greatest selection is stored in their shop on the famous Rue Cler, which is widely acknowledged to be the most authentic market street in Paris and possibly even in France. Their luxury tea fits in perfectly with this street’s nickname, “Paradise of Parisian food and drink”, for their tea is absolutely delightful.
Lieux emblématiques
In the center of Paris, one street’s dedication to good food and drink has stood the test of time. History might have claimed a facade or two on Rue Montorgueil, but the spirit of the place endures. Take a walk along its 350 meters of foodie heaven and learn of the literary greats who came and had a grand old time before you. For centuries, Parisians have been visiting Rue Montorgueil to shop for everything from cheese, bread and wine to pastries, oysters and more of the finer things in life. The shopfronts may have changed – some more than others – but glimpses of the original street remain, not least in the exposed wood of the buildings and the worn cobbles underfoot. If you’ve never heard of Rue Montorgueil, its neighbor Les Halles, which sits at the street’s southern end, might ring a bell. King Louis VI established the earliest incarnation of this marketplace, an open-air affair where merchants came to trade grain, in 1137. This is long gone, of course, as are the 19th-century wrought-iron pavilions that stood in its place; in 1969, city authorities relocated the food hall to the suburb of Rungis and installed an underground shopping center in its place. For many, this ripped the soul out of one of Paris’s most central districts; where once Parisians of all stripes had come to shop and eat and drink at all hours of the day and night, people tended to avoid. In 2016, a €1 billion redevelopment project seeking to reverse the area’s fortunes – the city’s largest infrastructure project for decades – was unveiled to mixed reviews, with one journalist branding it a “custard-colored flop”. In any event, Rue Montorgueil has fared rather better. While history has erased almost every trace of many of the establishments that helped make it famous, among Parisians and visitors in the know, others have survived pretty much intact. All that remains of Au Croissant, at No. 9, a cabaret once frequented by none other than 18th-century Venetian Lothario Giacomo Casanova, is a small crescent moon above the door’s molding; on the other hand, L’Escargot Montorgueil has been serving its escargot bourguignon (snails cooked in butter, parsley and garlic) at No. 38 undisturbed since 1832. Admirers of its signature dish can count Marcel Proust and Sarah Bernhardt for company. Despite this illustrious endorsement, the street’s most famous culinary establishment is a little bit further along, at No. 51. Pastry chef to King Louis XV, Nicolas Stohrer came to France from his native Poland with Marie Leszczyńska, a Polish princess and the future French queen consort, and opened his eponymous store in 1730. Among the sweet delights it has been trading on for approaching three hundred years, none are more feted than the baba au rhum, a boozy fruit cake served chilled with fresh chantilly and seasonal berries that Stohrer is said to have invented himself. The shop is small but ornate, with shimmering chandeliers and original murals by Paul Baudry, who created the frescoes of the Palais Garnier, Paris’s grand, 19th-century opera house. Describing Le Compas d’Or in 1873’s Le Ventre de Paris (The Belly of Paris), Émile Zola writes: “It was like a taste of the countryside right in Paris.” The decor of Le Compas, the brasserie that now occupies the terrace and ground floor of 62 Rue Montorgueil, is more industrial than rural chic, with its filament bulbs and studded-leather bar stools, but its menu is equally as appealing. For Honoré de Balzac, the taste of Paris was the taste of Rue Montorgueil, specifically of Au Rocher de Cancale, at No. 78. “To find Paris again!” he writes, in Honorine (1843). “Do you know what that means, O Parisians? It is to find – not indeed the cookery of the Rocher de Cancale as Borel elaborates it for those who can appreciate it, for that exists only in the Rue Montorgueil – but a meal which reminds you of it!” Indeed. The restaurant, established in 1804 and famed for its oysters, has a powder-blue and gold-detailed facade that’s hard to miss. Alexandre Dumas, the author of The Count of Monte Cristo (1844-46) and The Three Musketeers (1844), was another literary patron. While the first À la Mère de Famille, founded in 1761, is a 15-minute walk away, at 35 Rue du Faubourg Montmartre, the chocolate shop’s outpost at 82 Rue Montorgueil is still worth a visit. The antique typeface above and around the door harks back to a simpler, or at least less commercialised, time, and, inside, Paris’s oldest confectioner’s keeps as close as possible to its original recipes. Just before the Rue Montorgueil melts into Rue des Petits Carreaux at the intersection with Rue Saint-Saveur, there’s La Fermette, a fromagerie that local food writer David Lebovitz assures will become “your favourite cheese shop in the whole wide world”. It’s not a particularly historic address, No. 86, and its endorsements might not have come from the literary greats of the age, but it does speak to an immortal truth about Rue Montorgueil: this is a place to come and wander, shop to shop, restaurant to bar, to eat and drink and talk and remember all the good things about days and nights in Paris.
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Rue Montorgueil
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In the center of Paris, one street’s dedication to good food and drink has stood the test of time. History might have claimed a facade or two on Rue Montorgueil, but the spirit of the place endures. Take a walk along its 350 meters of foodie heaven and learn of the literary greats who came and had a grand old time before you. For centuries, Parisians have been visiting Rue Montorgueil to shop for everything from cheese, bread and wine to pastries, oysters and more of the finer things in life. The shopfronts may have changed – some more than others – but glimpses of the original street remain, not least in the exposed wood of the buildings and the worn cobbles underfoot. If you’ve never heard of Rue Montorgueil, its neighbor Les Halles, which sits at the street’s southern end, might ring a bell. King Louis VI established the earliest incarnation of this marketplace, an open-air affair where merchants came to trade grain, in 1137. This is long gone, of course, as are the 19th-century wrought-iron pavilions that stood in its place; in 1969, city authorities relocated the food hall to the suburb of Rungis and installed an underground shopping center in its place. For many, this ripped the soul out of one of Paris’s most central districts; where once Parisians of all stripes had come to shop and eat and drink at all hours of the day and night, people tended to avoid. In 2016, a €1 billion redevelopment project seeking to reverse the area’s fortunes – the city’s largest infrastructure project for decades – was unveiled to mixed reviews, with one journalist branding it a “custard-colored flop”. In any event, Rue Montorgueil has fared rather better. While history has erased almost every trace of many of the establishments that helped make it famous, among Parisians and visitors in the know, others have survived pretty much intact. All that remains of Au Croissant, at No. 9, a cabaret once frequented by none other than 18th-century Venetian Lothario Giacomo Casanova, is a small crescent moon above the door’s molding; on the other hand, L’Escargot Montorgueil has been serving its escargot bourguignon (snails cooked in butter, parsley and garlic) at No. 38 undisturbed since 1832. Admirers of its signature dish can count Marcel Proust and Sarah Bernhardt for company. Despite this illustrious endorsement, the street’s most famous culinary establishment is a little bit further along, at No. 51. Pastry chef to King Louis XV, Nicolas Stohrer came to France from his native Poland with Marie Leszczyńska, a Polish princess and the future French queen consort, and opened his eponymous store in 1730. Among the sweet delights it has been trading on for approaching three hundred years, none are more feted than the baba au rhum, a boozy fruit cake served chilled with fresh chantilly and seasonal berries that Stohrer is said to have invented himself. The shop is small but ornate, with shimmering chandeliers and original murals by Paul Baudry, who created the frescoes of the Palais Garnier, Paris’s grand, 19th-century opera house. Describing Le Compas d’Or in 1873’s Le Ventre de Paris (The Belly of Paris), Émile Zola writes: “It was like a taste of the countryside right in Paris.” The decor of Le Compas, the brasserie that now occupies the terrace and ground floor of 62 Rue Montorgueil, is more industrial than rural chic, with its filament bulbs and studded-leather bar stools, but its menu is equally as appealing. For Honoré de Balzac, the taste of Paris was the taste of Rue Montorgueil, specifically of Au Rocher de Cancale, at No. 78. “To find Paris again!” he writes, in Honorine (1843). “Do you know what that means, O Parisians? It is to find – not indeed the cookery of the Rocher de Cancale as Borel elaborates it for those who can appreciate it, for that exists only in the Rue Montorgueil – but a meal which reminds you of it!” Indeed. The restaurant, established in 1804 and famed for its oysters, has a powder-blue and gold-detailed facade that’s hard to miss. Alexandre Dumas, the author of The Count of Monte Cristo (1844-46) and The Three Musketeers (1844), was another literary patron. While the first À la Mère de Famille, founded in 1761, is a 15-minute walk away, at 35 Rue du Faubourg Montmartre, the chocolate shop’s outpost at 82 Rue Montorgueil is still worth a visit. The antique typeface above and around the door harks back to a simpler, or at least less commercialised, time, and, inside, Paris’s oldest confectioner’s keeps as close as possible to its original recipes. Just before the Rue Montorgueil melts into Rue des Petits Carreaux at the intersection with Rue Saint-Saveur, there’s La Fermette, a fromagerie that local food writer David Lebovitz assures will become “your favourite cheese shop in the whole wide world”. It’s not a particularly historic address, No. 86, and its endorsements might not have come from the literary greats of the age, but it does speak to an immortal truth about Rue Montorgueil: this is a place to come and wander, shop to shop, restaurant to bar, to eat and drink and talk and remember all the good things about days and nights in Paris.
Le Bal is a beautiful contemporary art gallery focused on showing the best of ‘l’image document,’ and different interpretations of our reality. The gallery focuses on photography, video, cinema, and other visual media. The space is large, and it holds permanent pieces as well as temporary exhibits. While Le Bal is known for its art, another popular attraction is its well known café that serves breakfast and brunch including (but not limited to) cheesecake, eggs and bacon, cakes, and breads. Wednesday: noon to 9pm Thursday: noon to 10 pm Friday: noon to 8pm Saturday: 11am to 8pm Sunday: 11am to 7pm
LE BAL
6 Impasse de la Défense
Le Bal is a beautiful contemporary art gallery focused on showing the best of ‘l’image document,’ and different interpretations of our reality. The gallery focuses on photography, video, cinema, and other visual media. The space is large, and it holds permanent pieces as well as temporary exhibits. While Le Bal is known for its art, another popular attraction is its well known café that serves breakfast and brunch including (but not limited to) cheesecake, eggs and bacon, cakes, and breads. Wednesday: noon to 9pm Thursday: noon to 10 pm Friday: noon to 8pm Saturday: 11am to 8pm Sunday: 11am to 7pm
Brunch
Run by a trio of ladies who decided to give up their day jobs to open a restaurant, Soul Kitchen is the perfect place to nourish the body after a soul-nourishing visit to the nearby Sacre-Coeur. The café serves homemade lunch, afternoon tea and dinner, using recipes based on locally sourced organic ingredients. It’s a delicious savoury menu comprising soups, pizzas, salads, couscous and vegetarian options, as well as scrumptious muffins, cupcakes and a host of other homemade pastries. The Soul Kitchen is bright and cheerful with vibrant tiled flooring and vintage furniture, making it a feel-good place with some seriously feel-good food. More Info Sun: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Mon: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Tue: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Wed: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Thu: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Fri: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm 33 Rue Lamarck, Paris, Île-de-France, 75018, France +33171379995
84
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Soul Kitchen
33 Rue Lamarck
84
当地人推荐
Run by a trio of ladies who decided to give up their day jobs to open a restaurant, Soul Kitchen is the perfect place to nourish the body after a soul-nourishing visit to the nearby Sacre-Coeur. The café serves homemade lunch, afternoon tea and dinner, using recipes based on locally sourced organic ingredients. It’s a delicious savoury menu comprising soups, pizzas, salads, couscous and vegetarian options, as well as scrumptious muffins, cupcakes and a host of other homemade pastries. The Soul Kitchen is bright and cheerful with vibrant tiled flooring and vintage furniture, making it a feel-good place with some seriously feel-good food. More Info Sun: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Mon: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Tue: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Wed: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Thu: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Fri: 8:45 am - 6:00 pm Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm 33 Rue Lamarck, Paris, Île-de-France, 75018, France +33171379995
Situated on a quaint back street running parallel to the rue des Abbesses, Les Tantes Jeanne is a friendly restaurant, welcoming meat lovers to an unusually splendid feast of tender cuts. The highly acclaimed Japanese Kobe meat features among the array of revisited French classics prepared with a creative twist and beautifully presented. Look out for the chef’s tantalising sweetbread cassoulet with cep mushrooms, or duck breast with Sichuan pepper, and don’t miss the selection of divine desserts including prune soufflé or fruit sorbet with champagne. Your detour from the main streets of Montmartre will be well rewarded. More Info Sun: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Sun: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Mon: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Tue: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Wed: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Wed: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Thu: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Thu: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Fri: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Fri: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Sat: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Sat: 6:00 pm - 12:00 am 42 Rue Véron, Paris, Île-de-France, 75018, France +33142511421
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LES TANTES JEANNE
42 Rue Véron
16
当地人推荐
Situated on a quaint back street running parallel to the rue des Abbesses, Les Tantes Jeanne is a friendly restaurant, welcoming meat lovers to an unusually splendid feast of tender cuts. The highly acclaimed Japanese Kobe meat features among the array of revisited French classics prepared with a creative twist and beautifully presented. Look out for the chef’s tantalising sweetbread cassoulet with cep mushrooms, or duck breast with Sichuan pepper, and don’t miss the selection of divine desserts including prune soufflé or fruit sorbet with champagne. Your detour from the main streets of Montmartre will be well rewarded. More Info Sun: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Sun: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Mon: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Tue: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Wed: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Wed: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Thu: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Thu: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Fri: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Fri: 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm Sat: 12:00 pm - 2:30 pm Sat: 6:00 pm - 12:00 am 42 Rue Véron, Paris, Île-de-France, 75018, France +33142511421
Street food
The simplicity of the menu is what makes this such a success, and the kebabs here will leave you with nothing like the usual 3am “probably going to regret this in the morning” feeling that we have come to associate with the dish. With only one meat on offer (veal), all you need do is decide which sauce tickles your fancy. The meat is succulent, the sauces are made from fresh ingredients and the men who serve you are delightful. You could ask for no more. The simplicity of the menu is reflected in the layout of the venue, which boasts nothing more than a few raised chairs and a counter. They know what they are doing and they do it well.
Grillé
15 Rue Saint-Augustin
The simplicity of the menu is what makes this such a success, and the kebabs here will leave you with nothing like the usual 3am “probably going to regret this in the morning” feeling that we have come to associate with the dish. With only one meat on offer (veal), all you need do is decide which sauce tickles your fancy. The meat is succulent, the sauces are made from fresh ingredients and the men who serve you are delightful. You could ask for no more. The simplicity of the menu is reflected in the layout of the venue, which boasts nothing more than a few raised chairs and a counter. They know what they are doing and they do it well.
Step inside and you will find an absolute treasure trove of edible treats. Like the numerous markets across the city, there is the usual wonderful array of fruit, vegetables, cheese, meat and fish on sale here, but it also houses a number of food outlets, with meals prepared to eat there and then. Take a journey across the globe, with cuisine from South America to Africa, all under one roof. Eateries within the market include (but are not exclusive to) the following: Alegria Brasil: a touch of Brazil in this little corner, with plastic chairs and tables to seat no more than 15 people, but wonderful, honest food that will hit the spot. Its speciality is Brazilian favorite feijoada, a black bean stew; best mopped up with a hunk of bread. La Marrakech: a beautiful little Moroccan corner, with a selection of tajines displayed at the front, and tiled walls. Go for the lemon chicken and you will not be disappointed. Oh Africa: a delicious menu featuring Senegalese speciality yassa and eclectic décor render this perhaps a highlight of the market. If you fancy something a little different, look no further. Chez Silviana: this Portuguese rotisserie is another asset to the market, selling both regional produce and food to go.
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Marché couvert Saint-Quentin
85B Boulevard de Magenta
6
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Step inside and you will find an absolute treasure trove of edible treats. Like the numerous markets across the city, there is the usual wonderful array of fruit, vegetables, cheese, meat and fish on sale here, but it also houses a number of food outlets, with meals prepared to eat there and then. Take a journey across the globe, with cuisine from South America to Africa, all under one roof. Eateries within the market include (but are not exclusive to) the following: Alegria Brasil: a touch of Brazil in this little corner, with plastic chairs and tables to seat no more than 15 people, but wonderful, honest food that will hit the spot. Its speciality is Brazilian favorite feijoada, a black bean stew; best mopped up with a hunk of bread. La Marrakech: a beautiful little Moroccan corner, with a selection of tajines displayed at the front, and tiled walls. Go for the lemon chicken and you will not be disappointed. Oh Africa: a delicious menu featuring Senegalese speciality yassa and eclectic décor render this perhaps a highlight of the market. If you fancy something a little different, look no further. Chez Silviana: this Portuguese rotisserie is another asset to the market, selling both regional produce and food to go.
This is one of the most culturally diverse streets in the city and another road where you will find good, authentic street food for refreshingly reasonable prices. For the adventurous among us, part of the fun is taking a chance on one of the many street-food vendors all the way up the road. From Turkish, to Indian, to Lebanese, you will find some of the most authentic foods from Asia and the Middle East, with Passage Brady being a favorite for curries. Steer clear of those with gaudy photographed formule menu options and you will be fine. However, if you want a fail-safe recommendation, Le Daily Syrien is it, where newsagent meets restaurant. The sandwiches (there’s that word again!) that you will find here are difficult to beat and are made right in front of you, so you can personalize your fillings. The aubergine caviar makes a very welcome and garlicky addition.
Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis
This is one of the most culturally diverse streets in the city and another road where you will find good, authentic street food for refreshingly reasonable prices. For the adventurous among us, part of the fun is taking a chance on one of the many street-food vendors all the way up the road. From Turkish, to Indian, to Lebanese, you will find some of the most authentic foods from Asia and the Middle East, with Passage Brady being a favorite for curries. Steer clear of those with gaudy photographed formule menu options and you will be fine. However, if you want a fail-safe recommendation, Le Daily Syrien is it, where newsagent meets restaurant. The sandwiches (there’s that word again!) that you will find here are difficult to beat and are made right in front of you, so you can personalize your fillings. The aubergine caviar makes a very welcome and garlicky addition.
This is the spot for a slightly more “artisan” style of street food (and a big hot burger). The market that takes place here, in the first arrondissement, hosts street-food king (and now restaurant, too) Cantine California, which serves the ultimate gourmet burger. Cantine California was set up by an American man who has brought the burger to Paris in a big way, and its truck pops up all over the city, so be sure to catch it if you can. Missed it? Head to the restaurant in the third arrondissement. If you are a late riser and unlikely to make it in time for the close of the market at 3pm, there are a few other street-food vendors around the square. Big Fernand has some particularly meaty burger options that rival those of Cantine California and stick to the same “quality ingredient” policy, while neighboring Café des Abattoirs does a mean meatball sandwich to take away during Saturday lunchtimes.
Place du Marché Saint-Honoré
This is the spot for a slightly more “artisan” style of street food (and a big hot burger). The market that takes place here, in the first arrondissement, hosts street-food king (and now restaurant, too) Cantine California, which serves the ultimate gourmet burger. Cantine California was set up by an American man who has brought the burger to Paris in a big way, and its truck pops up all over the city, so be sure to catch it if you can. Missed it? Head to the restaurant in the third arrondissement. If you are a late riser and unlikely to make it in time for the close of the market at 3pm, there are a few other street-food vendors around the square. Big Fernand has some particularly meaty burger options that rival those of Cantine California and stick to the same “quality ingredient” policy, while neighboring Café des Abattoirs does a mean meatball sandwich to take away during Saturday lunchtimes.